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Inspired By Nature Collection

Step 1 - Select Your Gin




Buy Online at: The Biggar Gin Co


Step 2 - Find Out More About The Artists


Allan Burnett


Who are you, where are you based, and what do you do?

My names is Allan Burnett. I am based in Carstairs, just outside Lanark. I work for the NHS and paint in my spare time.

Why do you make this type of art?

I paint using watercolour as I love its transparency and fluidity. More recently I’ve been experimenting with mixed media to give me vibrancy and looseness.

What inspires you?

I’m inspired by the works of WJM Turner, John Singer Sargent and Lucian Freud. A very eclectic group! I tend to focus on building and landscapes but will capture anything that catches my eye.

How do you make it?

I start by taking lots of photos, a plein air painting (or two), then back to my studio to combine it all together.

What does your art mean to you?

Art is a means of escape, my day job can be stressful and taking timeout to paint is an excellent way to unwind. I’m keen to increase my portfolio and continue to develop my skills. Who knows what the future brings.


Colin Semple


Who are you, where are you based, and what do you do?

My name is Colin Semple. I am a furniture maker based in the Old School in Stobo. I mainly work on commissioned pieces using locally sourced hard woods.

Why do you make this type of art?

I absolutely love the creative process. Getting to work with someone on a commission to take an idea from the initial stages through design and into the making process is fabulous. We have a wealth of beautiful timber available and it is a great material to work with.

What inspires you?

I get inspiration from many sources. Other people’s work can spark an idea but often I see shapes in nature and architecture that can find their way into pieces.

How do you make it?

I source seasoned timber from local saw-mills. My workshop has all the machinery and hand tools to turn that into finished pieces. Over recent years, I have worked with local artist Lesley Johnson on a few different collaborative pieces - it is always nice to be able to do work like that.

What does your art mean to you?

As I mentioned, I love the process but perhaps what gives me the biggest kick is knowing that my work will be valued and kept for years. I have always worked with wood as a hobby and I made it my full-time job in 2013 switching from a career in IT. I’d never go back!


Craig McMaster


Who are you, where are you based, and what do you do?

I am Craig McMaster, I mostly paint portrait and figurative. Mostly inspired by the Old Masters. I also make photographs of Scotland’s landscape, but not as prolific as I once was.

Why do you make this type of art?

I make this type of art (paintings) because I’m fascinated by the level of skill achieved by the old masters and their level of craftmanship. I aim to achieve my own level of skill and achieve the highest standard I can in this style of making art. I find the subject matter of people to be endlessly fascinating. Different characters, painted in different arrangements, using different lighting approaches.

What inspires you?

Inspired by beautiful and highly crafted art. Inspired by other painters who’ve dedicated themselves to achieve a very high standard and skill. I’m not there yet but I am trying. Inspired by figurative artists who capture bold human compositions, using bold lighting (shadows and light) to tell a story or narrative through their work.

How do you make it?

Painting is an escape from the modern world. I aim to create my own world inside paintings. I work in techniques that are 100s of years old, developed before the distractions of our modern world were created. I love the hands on creative process using the same materials that old masters used.

What does your art mean to you?

Painting is an escape and a creative process. Painting is a learning process that will never end; I aim to learn and improve constantly. Maybe one day I’ll paint a masterpiece, but not yet…


Jennifer Turner


Who are you, where are you based, and what do you do?

I am Jennifer Turner and I have worked for years designing furnishing fabrics, bed linens and wallcoverings, besides sometimes exhibiting as a painter and printmaker. I moved to Biggar earlier this year and my studio looks onto the High Street.

Why do you make this type of art?

I have always been creative and enjoyed making things. Originally my interest was hand embroidery and bead work and then I progressed to machine embroidery and making jewellery and now I have added felting and painting to my list of hobbies.

What inspires you?

My recent series of landscapes, all worked out in this local area, respond to the constantly changing light and weather, not to mention a longing for horizons.

How do you make it?

I work with a range of techniques from watercolours and inks, to textured collage. My printmaking work pushes boundaries of technique from dry point and soft ground etching to dense carborundum and collagraphy reliefs using found materials. However, I return often to working directly from life and and I love the rich depth and intensity of traditional oil paint.

What does your art mean to you?

The concentration of working. Beginning with an empty space, a glimmer of a thought and a feeling, then following, teasing out and developing that thought through the process to produce a tangible piece is, when it works, the pure joy of being human, a tiny link to the endless thread of artists and craftsmen through the ages.


Ken Lochhead – 1936 - 2006


Ken was born in Milngavie, Glasgow in 1936, but grew up in East Lothian. He was educated at the then Knox Institute in Haddington, North Berwick Primary, and George Watson’s School for Boys in Edinburgh. He studied architecture at Edinburgh College of Art between 1955 and 1960, in the years of William (Willie) Gillies and T. Elder Dickson as president and vice president. During that time he won the Sloane Medallion and a scholarship to travel in Italy. From an early age he was good at drawing and he was soon to make a name for himself, as an employed architect, for his perspective drawings.

We married in 1960, and in 1972 with five children to feed, Ken resigned from salaried employment to become a self employed artist. Between 1974 and 1979 we ran a coffee shop and gallery in Haddington, “The Primrose Gallery”. In 1986 we opened a gallery and gift shop in The Square, East Linton.

In Ken’s lifetime he produced an extensive range of greetings cards, limited edition prints, and a series of pictorial maps. Favourite places to paint were the West Coast of Scotland, and nearer to home, the fishing villages of Fife and of course East Lothian. He was greatly influenced by Chinese and Japanese art and the works of Turner, Mactaggart, Rowland Hilder, and the Scottish Colourists including Joan Eardley. Exhibitions of his work were held regularly throughout Scotland, and he was always a popular tutor to many art groups.

Since Ken’s death in 2006, I have held two retrospective exhibitions; in Peter Potter Gallery in Haddington, and in the new Heritage Centre on the Isle of Lismore. For both I have had made new open edition prints from his original watercolours. There is also a new range of photographic cards made from Ken’s slide collection, demonstrating his talent as a photographer.

Ken was a much loved and gifted watercolour artist; his great philosophy being “less is more”. I hope that you will enjoy looking at this catalogue of his work. K ENNETH JAMES LUDOVIC LOCHHEAD by Sheila Lochhead


Liz Gossan


Who are you, where are you based, and what do you do?

My name is Liz Bertram-Gossan and I live and work in the hills near Coulter. My work would be considered to be ceramic art rather than a functional pottery. I create individual ceramic art pieces, some combined with beautiful wood backgrounds. I also create ceramic pots which are fired to stoneware temperatures which means they can live inside and outside.

Why do you make this type of art?

I became interested in Ceramics when I was 14 by chance, because a locum art teacher knew how to work the school kiln. I completely love the process of working with the soft plastic, gritty clay through the various stages of drying, firing and glazing to create interesting, pleasing shapes.

What inspires you?

I live in an amazing place with rolling hills, wildlife and nature and spend free time touring other beautiful amazing places in Scotland. So, I have loads of opportunities to observe the changing shapes, colours and textures throughout the seasons. I am also inspired by other ceramic artists, both historical and current.

How do you make it?

I use different types of clay and building techniques depending on the piece I am creating. My slab roller has to work very hard for me, and my small curved flexible scraper and potters knife are probably my most important tools. I fire all my work twice, everything is bisque fired and then most pieces are fired to stoneware temperatures so the piece is vitrified, non-absorbent and extremely durable.

What does your art mean to you?

Working with clay is essential for me. It allows space for me to be creative and experiment but also to problem solve the many practical aspects of making ceramics. The anticipation of opening the kiln is always exciting and complete joy when a piece is a success.

If you would like to view my work in person before purchase, please contact me to make an appointment. All viewings will respect social distancing rules. If you are interested in a piece which has been sold, please contact me as I may have another one similar.


Sarah Dawnay


Who are you, where are you based, and what do you do?

I live near Symington close to the river Clyde, and spend time in the Highlands and the Hebrides. I paint in oil or acrylic, sometimes adding pastel or collage, and my work is becoming increasingly abstract.

Why do you make this type of art?

My interest is in the lie of the land, the walls and tracks dividing and subdividing it, the long views, the steepness of hills, the horizon, the stands of trees, the ever-changing skies, and always the sea.

What inspires you?

I am inspired by many C20 artists such as Diebenkorn and Lanyon, and have studied for some years with Robin Child at The Lydgate Art Research Centre.

I have exhibited across Scotland and in Edinburgh, London and at the RSA open exhibition.


Step 3 - View Inspired By Nature Collection online


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